User insight: Observing NIRS research with the Artinis PortaLite on elderly

User insight: Observing NIRS research with the Artinis PortaLite on elderly

We like to incorporate the user from the very first beginning in our development process. Talking with researchers and clinicians, we get to know what’s driving them and what their expectations and suggestions are for our devices. We are constantly trying to understand their feelings and see the world from their perspective to optimize our NIRS devices. One way of doing this is observing and questioning the user that is working with the device, and subject that is wearing the NIRS device. This way, we are trying to gain new insights for existing and future NIRS products.

Publication overview 2018

Publication overview 2018

A special thanks to our customers who published so many articles with our (f)NIRS devices and we hope you will keep on publishing in the future!

NIRS device specification overview

NIRS device specification overview

We offer the full spectrum of (f)NIRS devices, and all our devices can be mixed and matched to create your optimal setup within the same software. To aid you in finding the right device for your research we have drafted this comparative table below with the most important specifications for each device.

The do's and don'ts of baselines

The do's and don'ts of baselines

A common question we get from our customers is what is a baseline and how to use it. Generally with fNIRS, the absolute values are arbitrary. The period before a stimulus is often referred to as the baseline. In this blog we will describe the do's and don'ts of baselines.

Publication overview 2016

Publication overview 2016

At Artinis we consider ultimate success to be good publications by our customers. To see how we are doing we have systematically searched Google Scholar for NIRS and fNIRS publications.

3D Digitization and Co-Registration to the MNI brain template using OxySoft

3D Digitization and Co-Registration to the MNI brain template using OxySoft

How do we know that the most active channels are located over the brain region of interest and not somewhere else? Of course, an experienced researcher just knows where to place the optodes, but is that enough to convince a potential highly-critical reviewer or fellow scientist?